CCGL9007 Global Issues

Youth in a Global World

[This course is under the thematic cluster of ‘Sustaining Cities, Cultures, and the Earth’.]


Course Description

This course facilitates students as “young people” to be more aware of the interconnectedness of the world and to critically assess how globalization influences different aspects of young people’s daily lives. It also analyzes the proactive and positive role youth can play in the changing world, and provides students with an opportunity to propose how young people as global citizens can and should respond to transformations brought about by globalization. Various social issues or specific areas of youth global trends such as consumerism, transnationalism, cosmopolitanism and digitalism that confront young people in their everyday life will be examined in a systematic manner. By doing so, students will critically evaluate what global citizenship should entail in order to reduce inequality and promote care for human rights as well as human dignity in today’s global community.

Course Learning Outcomes

On completing the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate awareness, as “young people” themselves, of the interconnectedness of the world.
  2. Critically assess how globalization influences different aspects of young people’s daily lives.
  3. Analyze the proactive and positive role youth can play in the changing world.
  4. Propose how young people as global citizens can and should respond to transformations brought about by globalization.

Offer Semester and Day of Teaching

First semester (Wed)


Study Load

Activities Number of hours
Lectures 24
Tutorials 8
Reading / Self-study 40
Assessment: Essay / Report writing 40
Assessment: Group presentation (incl preparation) 20
Total: 132

Assessment: 100% coursework

Assessment Tasks Weighting
Group presentation 25
In-class quizzes 25
Tutorial participation 20
Written assignment 30

Required Reading

  • Santrock, J. (2016). Adolescence (16th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

Recommended Reading

  • Allen, J. P., & Miga, E. M. (2010). Attachment in adolescence: a move to the level of emotion relation. Journal of Social and Personal Relationship, 27, 181-190.
  • Armsel, E., & Smetana, J. G. (2011). Adolescent Vulnerabilities and opportunities: Constructivist and developmental perspectives. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Blakemore, S. J., & Mills, K. (2014). The social brain in adolescence. Annual Review of Psychology, 65, 187-207.
  • Chmielewski, W. X., Roessner, V., & Beste, C. (2015). Predictability and context determine differences in conflict monitoring between adolescence and adulthood. Behavioural Brain Research, 292, 10-18.
  • Espoito-Smythers, C., et al. (2014). Suicidal Behaviors in children and adolescents. In M. K. Nock (Ed.), Oxford handbook of suicide and self-injury. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Gibbs, J. T. (2014). Moral development and reality (3rd ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Goodstadt, L. F. (2013). Poverty in the midst of affluence: How Hong Kong mismanaged its prosperity. Hong Kong University Press.
  • Grossman, T., & Johnson, M. H. (2014). The early development of brain base for social cognition. In K. Oshsner & S. M. Kosslyn (Eds.), Oxford handbook of cognitive neuroscience. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Grotevant, H. D., & McDermott, J. M. (2014). Adoption: Biological and social processes linked to adaptation. Annual Review of Psychology, 65, 235-265.
  • Herrington, L. (2013). Globalization and religion in historical perspective: A paradoxical relationship. Religions, 4, 145–165.
  • Sanstrock, J. W. (2014). Adolescence. New York: McGraw Hill.
  • Smith, J., Hewitt, B., & Skrbiš, Z. (2015). Digital socialization: Young people’s changing value orientations towards internet use between adolescence and early adulthood. Information, Communication & Society, 18(9), 1022-1038.
  • Spencer, A. R. (2014). Childhood & adolescence: voyages in development. Belmont: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.
  • Steinberg, L. (2013). Adolescence. New York: McGraw Hill.
  • Walker, L. J. (2014). Prosocial exemplarity in adolescence and adulthood. In. L. Padilla-Walker & G. Carlos (Eds.), Prosocial development: A multidimensional approach. New York: Oxford University Press.

Course Co-ordinator and Teacher(s)

Course Co-ordinator Contact
Dr B.M.F. Law
Department of Social Work and Social Administration, Faculty of Social Sciences
Tel: 3917 2087
Email: blaw@hku.hk
Teacher(s) Contact
Dr B.M.F. Law
Department of Social Work and Social Administration, Faculty of Social Sciences
Tel: 3917 2087
Email: blaw@hku.hk